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Category: Counselling Chronicle

1.05.19

Counselling Chronicle (13)

Issue 13…

Focusing on Strengths

As a discipline, psychology is increasingly moving towards a greater focus on the strengths and virtues that allow a person to thrive. Combating a previous focus of psychology on deficits, weaknesses and illness, Positive Psychology

7.03.19

Counselling Chronicle (12)

Issue 12…

Sleep

We all know the importance of sleep, not enough and we feel fatigued, our thinking processes are slowed, we are more emotional, our memory is poorer, and we make mistakes and misjudgements. The topic of sleep is

3.10.18

Counselling Chronicle (10)

Issue Ten…

Encouraging Helpful Thinking

Our brains are constant instant messaging machines. They communicate a variety of information from our environment and seek a variety of input from us. It can feel as if we have an internal ‘narrator’ that

6.08.18

Counselling Chronicle (9)

Issue Nine…

The Adolescent Brain – Closed for Construction

Childhood is the period in which human beings undergo the most rapid change. While adolescents undergo many changes, perhaps one of the most significant (and, at times, infuriating) is their development

4.06.18

Counselling Chronicle (8)

Issue Eight…

The CPR of Resilience – Lessons from Andrew Fuller

In March both Chevalier College counsellors had the opportunity to attend a professional development seminar conducted by Andrew Fuller, a highly-regarded and well-published Australian child clinical psychologist. Andrew’s seminar

7.05.18

Counselling Chronicle (7)

Issue Seven…

Free Parenting Advice and Coaching with ReachOut

In 2017, ReachOut partnered with the Benevolent Society and commenced a new service targeted at parents and carers of adolescents.

Parents and carers may now access up to four free and

3.04.18

Counselling Chronicle (6)

Issue Six…

The Importance of a Balanced Lifestyle

Many high school students report difficulties managing stress relating to their studies. The 2012-2016 Youth Mental Health Report found that two of the top three concerns 15-19 year olds reported were: 1)

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